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FAQ – Frequently Asked Questions

Do you offer Audit Support

If you ever get audited by IRS or your State, we offer on-demand audit guidance by a tax professional to help you understand what exactly is going on.

Do you file back taxes

If you’re trying to figure out how to file back taxes, it can be hard to know where to start. But just take a deep breath…we’ve got you covered.

Do you provide online services

Absolutely, we offer online Tax Services packed with world class support for simple to the most complex tax returns. Contact Us for more details.

Tax Resources

Where’s My Refund?

The IRS issues most refunds in less than 21 days, although some require additional time.

Identifying Tax Scams

The IRS doesn’t initiate contact with taxpayers by email, text messages or social media channels to request personal or financial information.

Tax Calendar of Due Dates

Use the IRS tax calendar to view filing deadlines and actions each month. Access the calendar online from your mobile device or desktop.

IRS Forms and Instructions

Find the formsinstructions and publications you need to properly file a paper return.

Guide to Tax Identity Theft

Taxpayer Guide to Identity Theft, the IRS, the states and the tax industry joined together to enact new safeguards and take additional actions.

Taxpayer Bill of Rights

Taxpayers have the right to know what they need to do to comply with the tax laws. They’re entitled to clear explanations of the laws.

IRS Withholding Calculator

The IRS encourages everyone to use the Withholding Calculator to perform a quick “paycheck checkup.”

Glossary of Accounting Terms

The key to success in accounting and finance is a solid knowledge base gained through a well-planned education.

Top Frequently Asked Questions

There are several ways to tell us your address has changed:

 
Method Action
IRS form Use Form 8822, Change of Address or Form 8822-B, Change of Address or Responsible Party – Business
Tax return Use your new address when you file
Written statement

Send us a signed written statement with your:

  • full name
  • old address
  • new address
  • social security number, ITIN, or EIN

Mail your signed statement to the address where you filed your last return.

Oral notification

Tell us in person or by telephone. We’ll need you to verify your identity and the address we have on file for you. Please have ready:

  • your full name
  • your address
  • your date of birth
  • your social security number, ITIN or EIN

If you filed a joint return, and are still residing with your spouse, both you and your spouse should sign the form or statement.

If you filed a joint return and you now have separate addresses, each of you should notify us of your new, separate address.

Authorized representatives filing a form or written statement to change an address for a taxpayer must attach a copy of their power of attorney or Form 2848, Power of Attorney and Declaration of Representative. Unauthorized third parties can’t change a taxpayer’s address.

Changes of address through the U.S. Postal Service (USPS) may update your address of record on file with us based on what they retain in their National Change of Address (NCOA) database. However, even when you notify the USPS, not all post offices forward government checks, so you should still notify us.

For changes of address relating to an employment tax return, we issue confirmation notices (Notices 148A and 148B) for the change to both the new and former address.

It can take four to six weeks for a change of address request to fully process.

To claim your child as your dependent, your child must meet either the qualifying child test or the qualifying relative test:

  • To meet the qualifying child test, your child must be younger than you and either younger than 19 years old or be a “student” younger than 24 years old as of the end of the calendar year.
  • There’s no age limit if your child is “permanently and totally disabled” or meets the qualifying relative test.

In addition to meeting the qualifying child or qualifying relative test, your child must also meet all of the other tests to be your dependent:

  1. Dependent taxpayer test
  2. Citizen or resident test, and
  3. Joint return test

An unmarried dependent student must file a tax return if his or her earned or unearned income exceeds certain limits. To find these limits, refer to Dependents under Who Must File in Publication 501, Dependents, Standard Deduction and Filing Information. You can also refer to Do I Need to File a Tax Return? to see if your income requires you to file.

Even if you don’t have to file a federal income tax return, you should file if you can get money back (for example, you had federal income tax withheld from your pay or you qualify for a refundable tax credit). See Who Should File in Publication 501 for more examples.

No, one of the conditions of your installment agreement is that the IRS will automatically apply any refund due to you against taxes you owe. Because your refund isn’t Accounting Edge toward your regular monthly payment, continue making your installment agreement payments as scheduled.

If your refund exceeds your total balance due on all outstanding liabilities including accruals, and you don’t owe certain past-due amounts, such as federal tax, state tax, a student loan, or child support, you’ll receive a refund of the amount over and above what you owe.

Generally, to qualify for head of household filing status, you must have a qualifying child or a dependent. However, a custodial parent may be eligible to claim head of household filing status based on a child even if he or she released a claim to exemption for the child.

It depends on the type of mistake you made:

  • Many mathematical errors are caught during the processing of the tax return and corrected by the IRS, so you may not need to correct these mistakes.
  • If you didn’t claim the correct filing status or you need to change your income, deductions, or credits, you should file an amended or corrected return using Form 1040X,  Amended U.S. Individual Income Tax Return.

When filing an amended or corrected return:

  • Include copies of any forms and/or schedules that you’re changing or didn’t include with your original return.
  • To avoid delays, file Form 1040X only after you’ve filed your original return. Generally, for a credit or refund, you must file Form 1040X within 3 years after the date you timely filed your original return or within 2 years after the date you paid the tax, whichever is later.
  • Allow the IRS up to 16 weeks to process the amended return.

A split refund lets you divide your refund, in any proportion you want, and direct deposit the funds into up to three different accounts with U.S. financial institutions. Use Form 8888, Allocation of Refund (Including Savings Bond Purchases) to request to have your refund split or to use part or all of your refund to buy up to $5,000 in paper or electronic U.S. Series I Savings Bonds for yourself or someone else.

You must make estimated tax payments for the current tax year if both of the following apply:

  • You expect to owe at least $1,000 in tax for the current tax year after subtracting your withholding and refundable credits.
  • You expect your withholding and refundable credits to be less than the smaller of:
    • 90% of the tax to be shown on your current year’s tax return, or
    • 100% of the tax shown on your prior year’s tax return. (Your prior year tax return must cover all 12 months.)

There are special rules for:

  • Farmers and fishermen
  • Certain household employers
  • Certain higher income taxpayers
  • Nonresident aliens

Social security benefits include monthly retirement, survivor and disability benefits. They don’t include supplemental security income (SSI) payments, which aren’t taxable. The net amount of social security benefits that you receive from the Social Security Administration is reported in Box 5 of Form SSA-1099, Social Security Benefit Statement, and you report that amount on line 5a of Form 1040, U.S. Individual Income Tax Return. The taxable portion of the benefits that’s included in your income and used to calculate your income tax liability depends on the total amount of your income and benefits for the taxable year. You report the taxable portion of your social security benefits on line 5b of Form 1040.

Your benefits may be taxable if the total of (1) one-half of your benefits, plus (2) all of your other income, including tax-exempt interest, is greater than the base amount for your filing status.

The base amount for your filing status is:

  • $25,000 if you’re single, head of household, or qualifying widow(er),
  • $25,000 if you’re married filing separately and lived apart from your spouse for the entire year,
  • $32,000 if you’re married filing jointly,
  • $0 if you’re married filing separately and lived with your spouse at any time during the tax year.

If you’re married and file a joint return, you and your spouse must combine your incomes and social security benefits when figuring the taxable portion of your benefits. Even if your spouse didn’t receive any benefits, you must add your spouse’s income to yours when figuring on a joint return if any of your benefits are taxable.

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